Software for small scale industries

Small-scale industries are inextricably imagined as the grittier enterprises, of pastry chefs barking orders from a dough-filled counter or chief executives of garage startups eating Chinese takeaway while watching the markets. Where technology and sophistication fit into those notions is a hideaway. Most small-scale industries are more wired than people think, and they are encumbered by the same brambly supply chains and skiddy demand predictions.

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Independent business owners are also pictured crunching numbers manually on a grease table piled with crumpled receipts. Enterprise software has not taken away this reality, but they seem to figure more often in the launching phase than in the operational phase. The trend in business launching suites offers processes such as capital and employee management.

There’s a truth to small-scale industries being more hands-on, of phone calls made here and there to suppliers, and coffee table discussions between matey partners on prospects for business expansion. But its books are no less harangued by the need for accuracy. So much of business survival relies on cutting unnecessary costs and keeping within budgets. Meanwhile, enterprise software are not the exclusive domain of multi-million accounts.

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Conceptually, these all started as watered-down systems of tracking and calculation. That they are employed more often by bigger firms is actually the reverse of basic necessity. Logically, enterprise software should work more like a gem for small-scale industries. The gap may be in the costs of taking on the soft technology while the independents wait to break even, as opposed to the heavy capitalization of huge corporations that can easily custom-fit their computerized systems to their business processes.

Charles Phillips is the CEO of enterprise software giant Infor. For more updates on the enterprise software industry, visit this Facebook page.